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Aneta Bogdanova

Aneta Bogdanova
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From Bulgaria to BGSU, Destination: Photoscience

Aneta Bogdanova

As a graduate student in the Department of Organic Synthesis at Sofia University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Bulgaria, I worked on the synthesis of some unsaturated triazine derivatives with herbicidal and bactericidal activity. I enjoyed both the synthetic work and the herbicidal activity studies.

Concerned with the effect of exposure to herbicides on humans, animals, and water quality, I gathered scientific information about the toxicity and environmental impact of herbicidal use. Many processes such as adsorption, transfer, breakdown and degradation influence what happens to herbicides in the environment. I became particularly interested in the fate of herbicides when exposed to sunlight. From that moment my research was focused primarily on the photodegradation of triazine herbicides. I studied their degradation time, degradation products, and the effect of sunlight intensity. As time went by, my interest in chemical processes that are accompanied or catalyzed by the absorption or emission of UV or visible light continued to grow.

Aneta Bogdanova

While working as a research assistant in the same department I was involved in several joint projects under the TEMPUS Program (Trans-European Mobility Scheme for University Studies). Through this program, our research group had the great opportunity to collaborate with leading scientific groups from universities in Germany, Belgium, France, England, and Spain. I had the chance to visit their laboratories and use their facilities to perform part of my research. The more involved in photochemical projects I was, the more interested I became in pursuing a higher degree in this field. During my visit to the University of Wurzburg, Germany, Prof. Waldemar Adam informed me about the Center for Photochemical Sciences at BGSU and encouraged me to continue my education there. After I explored the possibilities I was accepted and enrolled in their Ph.D. program in the fall of 1999.

I completed the program in almost five years; I graduated in spring of 2004. Now I am working as a postdoctoral research associate in Dr. Neckers’ group at the Center. My research projects aim to create polymer coatings for ship hulls that possess antifouling properties. More specifically, I am working on the synthesis of new monomers that are capable of photopolymerization. I am interested in developing new polymer materials that have surface degradation mechanisms, investigating the load bearing capabilities of the polymer frameworks, and achieving the controlled release of biocides.

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